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Our Work
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Impact Area

Wetlands

A natural defense system for drought, floods and climate change.

Working hand-in-hand with Canadians, we are conserving our remaining wetlands.

We have a lot to show for more than 80 years of conservation work. But it is far from done. We are building on the momentum of our successes—working with our supporters to protect and restore our natural defense systems.

Our understanding of wetlands is growing, but they continue to decrease. In settled areas of Canada, up to 70% of our wetlands have already been destroyed or degraded. As they continue to disappear, so too do the many benefits they provide.

They protect us from flooding, drought and climate change. They protect wildlife by providing hundreds of species with safe places to eat, sleep and raise young. They give us natural places to play, learn and explore. They also clean the water we enjoy at beaches, lakes and rivers.

Together, we can restore our wetlands.

Chilliwack Middle School students clean up Hope Slough

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Boreal wetlands
Boreal wetlands © DUC

Taking Action

Wetlands are like nature’s well-oiled defense system, formed over millions of years.

Canada’s wetlands are diverse. They take the form of marshes, bogs, fens, swamps and open water. They appear on the prairies, in the boreal forest, along coastlines and even in the tundra. Every type helps to keep our communities healthy and safe. Right now, we’re working on projects that:
  • Restore wetlands that have already been lost. Drainage, urban expansion and resource extraction are the biggest threats. Our work has resulted in more than 11,826 completed habitat projects, 6.4 million acres of secured habitat and 201.8 million acres of positively influenced habitat.
  • Our research and best practices will be shared with industry and government to help them be sustainable. It has driven positive change in these sectors across Canada.
  • Improve the quality of our waters by fighting invasive species. Turning back invasive species takes science, engineering and commitment.