Anas cyanoptera

Cinnamon teal drake. ©DUC

The male cinnamon teal gives a thin whistled “peep” or “peer.” Female cinnamon teal have a somewhat more guttural quacking than female blue-winged teal.

Appearance

  • Small dabbling duck.
  • Male has a cinnamon-red head and body with a brown back, a red eye and a dark bill.
  • The female has a mottled brown body, a pale brown head, brown eyes and a grey bill and is very similar in appearance to a female blue-winged teal; however its overall color is richer and its bill is longer.
  • Young male resembles a female or a blue-winged teal, but eyes are red.

Breeding

  • Cinnamon teal generally select new mates each year.
  • They are known to interbreed with blue-winged teals.
  • Nests are often located in grassy areas and island nesting is common.
  • Female cinnamon teal lay an average of eight to 10 eggs.

Habitat: Marshes and ponds for breeding. They prefer small, shallow alkaline wetlands surrounded by low herbaceous cover.

Range: Breeding in the western U.S. and southwestern Canada. Most winter in northern South America and the Caribbean, generally not migrating as far as the blue-winged teal. Some winter in California and southwestern Arizona.

Diet: Cinnamon teal mainly eat plants. Their diet also includes mollusks and aquatic insects.

View more waterfowl species