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Migration Tracker

Fall migration is here

Nature’s version of rush hour is now underwaycomplete with raucous honking and a good deal of ruffled feathers.

There’s an amazing spectacle of birds on the move right outside our doors. Tell us what birds you see, and where, this migration season and support the critical conservation efforts that keep our favourite species flying high all year long.

Beginning August 20record your bird sightings using the DUC Migration Tracker project hosted on iNaturalistWhether it’s a flock of mallards spotted at a nearby wetland, or a goldfinch spied while strolling in the park, any bird species at any location will do. The most important thing is to observe, experience and enjoy the season. Your observations will provide valuable data that will inform future conservation efforts.

Migrating Canada goose flock.

Share your migration moments on DUC’s Migration Tracker!

What species are you spotting? Beginning August 20, record your bird sightings using the DUC Migration Tracker project hosted on iNaturalist.


Other ways to get involved

Take action and support our feathered friends in other ways

Turn your lights off

Turn your lights off

Help birds get where they’re going at night by reducing light pollution that can confuse them and lead to collisions with buildings.

Download the My DUC<small><sup>TM</sup></small> App

Download the My DUCTM App

Visit one of our habitat projects, bring your binoculars and get a firsthand look at the difference on-the-ground conservation is making. New locations are being added every month.

Participate in a DUC fundraising event

Participate in a DUC fundraising event

Check out our Duck & Run or Outdoor Event Series for opportunities to have some fun while supporting conservation.

Sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up for our e-newsletter

Stay up to date on DUC conservation news.


Migration Miniseries

Discover more about the incredible journeys taken by North America’s migratory birds

 

Migratory birds need your help

Habitat loss across the country is threatening the lives of North America’s migratory birds. Support DUC’s efforts to conserve and restore the wetlands and grasslands they need to rest, refuel and raise their young.


Resources and Stories

Info to help you get the most out of migration:

How Duck Flight Works

How Duck Flight Works

Migrating ducks can best be appreciated while in flight. We break down the marvels of mechanics, structure and aerodynamics that make their long journeys possible (along with habitat).

Ducks from a distance: helpful hints for identification in the wild

Ducks from a distance: helpful hints for identification in the wild

Tips from waterfowl experts on overcoming identification challenges for the 20+ species of ducks that live in North America.

Songbird Banding at Oak Hammock Marsh

Songbird Banding at Oak Hammock Marsh

A songbird banding station outside of Ducks Unlimited Canada’s national offices in Manitoba nets a fraction of the thousands of birds that rely on the surrounding wetland every spring and fall.

Cloudy with a chance of waterfowl

Cloudy with a chance of waterfowl

Radar technology informs the weather forecast…and plays an important role in conservation

Dragonflies and monarchs: a two-generation migration

Dragonflies and monarchs: a two-generation migration

In the world of dragonfly and butterfly migration, it takes two generations to complete a round-trip. Adults migrate south in the fall and their offspring return north in the spring.

Light weight and information-heavy

Light weight and information-heavy

How research scientists are using feathers to learn more about waterfowl

Migrating to Mexico’s mangroves

Migrating to Mexico’s mangroves

Up to 20 per cent of North America’s waterfowl migrate to overwinter in Mexico. But the wetlands they depend on there are threatened. That’s why committed conservationists are working tirelessly on their behalf, to protect these unique habitats.