Help save our lakes from toxic algae by protecting wetlands — Ducks Unlimited Canada Skip to main content

Help save our lakes from toxic algae by protecting wetlands

Every year, areas of the Great Lakes are plagued with blue-green algae. Our favourite beaches and lakes get coated in sludge, making them unattractive and unsafe. And as our climate continues to warm, algae issues are expected to get worse.

THE DANGERS OF ALGAE

Blue-green algae isn’t just gross. It can be toxic.

Toxic algae can make people sick and kill fish and other aquatic life. We saw it in Lake Erie in 2015, when a bloom the size of New York City took over a portion of the lake—and we are watching as the threat grows again this year.

 

Blue green algae may be ancient, but it’s growing in our Great Lakes at dangerous levels today. © The Weather Network

Wetlands need your help

Support wetland conservation by donating just $39 to become a member today—and we’ll send you a free DUCGear™ Dry Bag. It’s our way of saying thanks for helping us protect Canada’s wetlands, water and wildlife.

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Urban Wetland Infographic

Wetlands: THE NATURAL SOLUTION TO TOXIC ALGAE

Wetlands are nature’s toughest defence against algae. They are scientifically proven to filter out the pollutants that fuel toxic algal blooms.

Even though wetlands are vital for healthy water, Canadians have undervalued them. In some municipalities near the Great Lakes, more than 95 per cent of wetlands have been destroyed. Research shows this loss is directly linked to the area’s declining water quality.

For more than 80 years, Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) has been delivering conservation that benefits every Canadian, including wetland restorations in southern Ontario. Now, as concerns about toxic algae grow, we need your help to make a greater conservation impact.

Wetlands need your help

Support wetland conservation by donating just $39 to become a member today—and we’ll send you a free DUCGear™ Dry Bag. It’s our way of saying thanks for helping us protect Canada’s wetlands, water and wildlife.