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Climate Change

Our scientists answer your questions

DUC scientists answer some of the most searched climate change questions

Pascal Badiou and Dave Howerter, scientists with our Institute for Wetland and Waterfowl Research, answer some of the most frequently-Googled questions about climate change.

We want to answer your questions

Learn and win

Submit your question now and be entered in a draw to win a DUC Gear™ cap*.

Select questions will be answered by our scientists and published on our social media accounts and on this page.

*Random draw will take place on September 24, 2021, at 12:00 noon CDT. Winners will be notified via email.

Examples of impacts of climate change across Canada
Examples of impacts of climate change across Canada © DUC
Pacific Coast

Pacific Coast

Climate change and rising tides along the Pacific coast pose a critical threat to families, business and the ecosystem. We are helping to address the impacts of sea-level rise through collaboration, partnership and critical conservation work.

Boreal Forest

Boreal Forest

Conserving boreal wetlands is critical. These natural areas, which include peatlands, accumulate and store vast amounts of carbon. As much as 27.9 billion tonnes of carbon is estimated to be stored in Manitoba’s boreal peatlands – an amount equivalent to more than a century of Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions. DUC works with governments, Indigenous peoples, scientists, industry and other like-minded organizations to take a balanced approach to conserve the boreal forest.

Prairie Pothole Region

Prairie Pothole Region

Extreme weather events like droughts and floods are quickly becoming a way of life in Canada. The Pothole Prairie Region is home to 777,000-square-kilometres of critical habitat, which provides carbon storage, water supply and purification, recreational opportunities and agricultural opportunities. We are working to secure what is left of the original prairies for restoration projects to bring lost wetlands and grasslands back to life.

Great Lakes - St. Lawrence

Great Lakes - St. Lawrence

Invasive species overwhelm habitat, choking out native wildlife and vegetation. They spread aggressively and hold their ground stubbornly. Climate change can hasten the introduction and spread of invasive species. We are working with partners to monitor and control the spread of invasive species in the region.

Atlantic

Atlantic

As waves crash into Canada’s shorelines, our coastlines are changing, washing away and revealing new stretches of beach that were once solid earth. Salt marsh restoration is one tool among many to combat coastal erosion and beat back climate change. As DUC looks to manage coastal infrastructure and conserve wetlands, often the best solutions are to return sites to their natural states.

Arctic

Arctic

Climate change is occurring more rapidly in the Arctic than elsewhere. Melting sea ice and industrialization are largely human-induced contributors to the rise of contaminants like mercury in Arctic ecosystems. DUC and the Inuit of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region Joint Secretariat and Oceans North Canada are researching breeding and migratory waterfowl populations as they represent an important source of information to track the response of waterfowl populations to these changes.

Are you an educator looking for climate change resources?

We have packaged up activities to help students learn how wetlands play a role in fighting climate change, how to work through emotions associated with climate change, and how we can take action together.